Job Description of a Vice President of Sales

On many occasions Peak’s customers has been asked us to provide a template for defining the role of the Vice President of Sales. While every company has a different sales mandate and priorities, at the core the VP Sales is responsible for revenues and the execution of the company’s sales plan. We tend to prefer job descriptions that outline what needs to be achieved over how it will be achieved – that is the Sales VP’s job. If you wonder what your style you follow, read our post on different kinds of leaders here.

The following job description provides a useful baseline for any company that employs or is seeking to hire sales leadership.

Job Description: Vice President of Sales

  • directly responsible for the company’s revenue
  • develop plans and strategies for developing business and achieving the company’s sales goals
  • manage the use of budgets
  • manage the sales teams, operations and resources to deliver profitable growth
  • define and oversee incentive programs that motivate the sales team to achieve their sales targets
  • define and coordinate sales training programs that enable staff to achieve their potential and support company sales objectives
  • exceed customer expectations and contribute to a high level of customer satisfaction
  • hire and develop sales staff
  • provide detailed and accurate sales forecasting
  • put in place infrastructure and systems to support the success of the sales function
  • compile information and  data related to customer and prospect interactions
  • monitor customer, market and competitor activity and provide feedback to company leadership team and other company functions
  • work closely with the marketing function to establish successful channel and partner programs
  • manage key customer relationships and participate in closing strategic opportunities
  • travel for in-person meetings with customers and partners and to develop key relationships

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